Music—as an abstract connection between the ‘spaces’ we humans move into when sound comes on, driven by emotion, come closer to each other as it plays out certain frequencies. In return, we function out of love amongst people we could care less for once the music is off. Although there is the aftershock, this illustrates a vehicle of love, and the key to bringing the human race together as one. But it’s not enough because we forget. I wrote ‘Budd’s Soundtrack‘ in one night, and edited over the weekend after listening to Hippo Campus‘ new album, ‘BAMBI’. Why that matters? I began this piece listening to their album, and because it’s Tuesday, my first impression of it leaves this on my life’s soundtrack…. Photo by Namroud Gorguis (Unsplash)

Tuesday October 2, 2018

Blinded by music as it takes us into our next journey in life, through a sequence of emotional episodes, we manifest memories of moments with family, time at work, and fun shit! As a song takes you into retrograde, the recollection of thoughts allow you to appreciate that even in the worst of times, you’ve had time to think things over.

Time to think over decisions you made that were derived from emotions. But do most of us think in the now anyways? Meaning, disregarding the data of emotions, maybe music is a distraction. Ironically, lyrics fuel much of what’s written today.

Like a passenger in this world, riding on the roller-coasters of courage and dopamine, music takes me there. Where? To places I wanna’ make rash decisions.

Feeling music for the first time at an early age, I’m old enough to recall how Warren G. and Bone Thugs put me in their shoes. I didn’t want to be them, maybe in the context of their music, but like the rock music I listen to, it triggers a compartment I have embedded in me. It led me to configuring where my emotions come from, why music emerges irrational desires, and to myself, why do I listen to everything? Luckily, no rash decisions are ever made listening to music.

What’s made is an emotional oath, or feeling from the music influencing thoughts, painted pictures, and judgements of how we see the world through sound. Derived by our thoughts, influenced by emotions, and carried out by the environment, it can sound so beautiful, don’t you agree?

Periodically, I go into retrograde, ignoring the guilt because of my father’s (mis)judgement of me. But that’s neither here nor there. Where is it exactly? It’s where I turn the music down in my car, so the elderly drivers pulling up next to me assume I’m one of the good ones.

Then after asking myself why, depending on the intersection and song, I turn it back up.

Listening to the music my father grew up on and what empowered his lifestyle, I thought for one genre of music to be assumed respected above the other, doesn’t mean it’s better. As a preacher’s son, I grew conflicted with this.

A genre at best portrays the diverse lifestyles of people who care to connect with it. Without categorizing those who listen, it’s also the people who create the art, pictures, and noise, who are experiencing such illustrated emotions. The artists create what’s appealing to the people, from what they envision, and more importantly, their unique abstract feelings to transpire into finite creations. If the art is inconsistent with the people over time, it slowly dies within the community and becomes history.

With the appropriate influencers, some artists evolve with the people, which expresses their degree of connectivity.

Among those who arrive at many forms of art, with music being the platform, Bob Marley and the Rasta’ nation’s energy advocates for one-love. Producers of music such as Quincy Jones, who evolved his energy from, It’s My Party, Thriller, to speaking on a political platform promoting global world peace, love, and happiness—artists make sound emit the vernacular of our souls.

“Not one drop of my self worth, depends on your acceptance of me”

-Quincy Jones

Art is embedded in us—it’s why we buy the shit. The visual connection we see as humans coming together as individuals in a venue during a performance, is love in motion.

Taylor Swift created music as a bridge, for many people to cry rivers over, and drown out their momentary sorrows. She also made a song I twice partied to. And because I once dreamt with a broken heart, I created a bridge via John Mayer’s guitar and acoustic creations.

My father, who thought I’d end up in the picture hip-hop and rap paints for the world, was wrong. If he were here today, I’d tell him I don’t get to be in those pictures—I’m here to appreciate it. The communities that support it, for the artists to thrive, paints that picture.

Most of us are here to watch, respectfully.

Music, whether it be a picture in your head, an era you recall, or an imminent emotion, brings people together for our understandings… It’s made for our energies to be in motion, and you can see it move when the music comes on, can’t you? Hence, Emotion.

Emotion is the abstracted energy we embrace, or embraces us rather. From good emotions, sad emotions, to our angered feelings, these emotions are true to every listener. Rhythm puts distinct meanings behind it. And what’s great about it, you can decide that emotion.

I’d argue that if you don’t understand, or appreciate a particular genre of music, then you don’t care to understand the origins of the people who create it. And to a degree, its purpose. The artist, who emerge from the people, create the music. So maybe you don’t want to embrace the genre’s culture either…

I like getting readers to think…:) It’s your brain, use it, respectfully.

Because artists do it all through LOVE!

But through an allusion of love amongst others at a concert—where their music enables us to love thy neighbor, who’s bumping into shoulders unwelcome, very possible.

It’s love in the allusion that a genre’s supporting culture, enabling respect to its people and listeners, empowers by awareness for communities to thrive.

It brings an understanding to people through the artists’ lyrics. It’s why we hold great appreciation to them as beacons of the world—they are the voice of the people.

And lastly, this is love you jive-turkeys, in the allusion that it creates structure in our daily lives. Because everyone has songs, or a playlist for moods that’ll set the tone for our next tasks. For me, music is to structure, as function is to life; empowering people to organize and focus on loving, laughing, and fun shit, again!

Music takes listeners beyond understanding, beyond meaning, and into a perception where we’re connected to the artist. Appreciating their stories as if it’s our soundtrack we’re partying to, there’s no thinking over what’s going on our playlist next.

If it feels good, you’ll move better. And if you’re moving better, you’ll be better.

This is debatable, but for wordplay; if you’re being better, you’ll create better. Not art specifically, but a better lifestyle consistently.

Budd

Born and raised in Portland, Oregon, Budd writes to encourage readers to explore the depths of their inner ocean, an unexplored self, because it's fun once you get through the emotional part... "The words we speak become our vehicle; what you read is how I digest them.” -Budd

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